Tinsley Keefe Discusses: Is Your Debt Really Your Fault?

When you first think about this question, your answer might come immediately: yes, your debt is your fault. Technically speaking, you are right. For some reason, you fell behind on payments or you let your accounts get overdrawn. However, Tinsley Keefe has been a skiptracer in Oklahoma City long enough to know that not all situations are alike. There are times where your debt might actually be someone else’s fault. For example, what happens when your (now) ex-wife/husband put you so far in debt without you even realizing it? You are left paying back thousands of dollars that you never spent in the first place.

Tinsley Keefe Discusses: Is Your Debt Really Your Fault?Tinsley recalls one particular situation in Oklahoma, while working as a skiptracer, where the person was in debt solely due to overdraft fees in a checking account. Unfortunately, banks can be tricky things to master. If you happen to find yourself in a situation like this, the best thing that Tinsley can suggest is transferring from a bank to a credit union – and keeping a checkbook. There are many things you will learn as you grow older, and one of those things is the benefits of keeping track of the money going in and out of your account. On the off chance that you do happen to overdraft in a credit union’s checking account as opposed to a bank’s checking account, the fee is usually a lot cheaper to deal with.

Of course, debt comes in all shapes and sizes. Some people find themselves on the other end of a debt collector because they stopped paying student loans or debt consolidations. The point that Tinsley is trying to get across after working as an OKC skiptracer for so long is that sometimes, your debt really is not your fault. Sometimes, society has a funny way of keeping you under the water; barely able to breathe. Sometimes you find yourself struggling paycheck to paycheck – how are you supposed to pay your debt when you can barely pay your bills? Tinsley offers some words of advice for those struggling with debts of varying degrees. First and foremost, learning to budget is very important as you grow older.

Not only should you be keeping a checkbook, but you should be keeping a monthly budget detailing all of your expenses. If you detail your monthly income, your bills and loans, spending money, and even what goes into savings, you will realize that living paycheck to paycheck will not be a forever-type-thing. Furthermore, do not be afraid to seek debt consolidation or general budgeting help from willing and relevant individuals. No one wants to be under the eye of an efficient skiptracer – especially when your debt is out of your control. For those suffering unjust situations like an ex-spouse racking up credit cards, make sure you realize that court is always an option. Otherwise, make sure you secure your personal details in the future.

In the end, if you try your hardest to avoid debt collectors by following Tinsley’s tips, chances are you will be successful.